HPV Endurance event at Dimboola
HPV Endurance event at Dimboola

It was a bitter and cold morning and the teams started setting up their marques in pit lane on the weekend.

The vehicles were inspected and teams were briefed on the day's tactics. This was an endurance race and full speed was not the goal.

The Dimboola Recreation Reserve played host to the exciting sport of Human Powered Vehicles.  

 

Horsham had two teams entered out of the seven teams in the event. St Trinity Lutheran School Horsham and the Horsham College.  There was two teams from Ballarat, one each from Hamilton, Millicent and Mt Gambier in South Australia.

 

There was 19 vehicles on the track for the six hour endurance event. Each vehicle had a team of drivers who were rostered to take their turn throughout the day.  The younger drivers had a 20 minute stint in the vehicle and the older ones had about 50 minutes. Most of the drivers were school aged college students.

 

Dimboola Town Committee supported the day with volunteer help and Hindmarsh Shire Council senior staff where their to ensure the event was a success.

 

The Human Powered Vehicles are a pedal powered frame with aerodynamic cowling to reduce the friction of the wind.  The driver sits in a cocoon made of composite material and the drive mechanism is similar to a push bike with pedals and chain driveline.

 

Like motor racing, the HPV vehicles have evolved over time and visitors to the Dimboola event had a good display of old and the new models. Some showed some war battle scars of events gone by.

 

While the event was incident free, the competitors can come to grief.  On a full blown race day, there can be over 65 vehicles on the track at one time which makes for some spectacular mishaps amongst the drivers. The track the racers use in Maryborough has what they have labeled ‘Crash Corner’.  They consider the Dimboola track a safer facility and there is no place on the circuit that can earn a similar title.

 

As this was an endurance event it was not about reaching top speeds. This did not stop Dimboola Sergeant Neil Zipple from recording some speeds with his speed camera.

“I have recorded speeds between 25 klmh and 55 klmh,” said Sergeant Zipple.

The event organisers were more than happy with the event at Dimboola. The only criticism was that the track was a little rough and it was felt that it needs resurfacing for the vehicles to perform at their best.

There was many of the local who came and went throughout the day to experience the event, however the cold day would have deterred many.

HPV drivers Bec McColl, Emily Wright and Ahren Koch from the Ballarat Community team RODE R.A.G.E.
HPV drivers Bec McColl, Emily Wright and Ahren Koch from the Ballarat Community team RODE R.A.G.E.
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