Home Dimboola Banner Street and reserve trees conversation held

Street and reserve trees conversation held

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Mapping ideas were Urban Forest Consulting Meg Caffin, Jan John, Ian Barry and Jonathan Starks at the table as Norm Ashenbrener and Deita Ashenbrener looks on
Mapping ideas were Urban Forest Consulting Meg Caffin, Jan John, Ian Barry and Jonathan Starks at the table as Norm Ashenbrener and Deita Ashenbrener looks on

Hindmarsh Shire Council recently conducted a series of conversation sessions around the shire to talk about trees in the community.

Director of Infrastructure, Shane Power and Strategic Assets and Planning Manager,

Janette Fritsch attended sessions on behalf of council.

Consultant, Meg Caffin from Urban Forest Consulting presented their research into Dimboola to a small  group of interested community members.

Dimboola has 1,579 recorded street trees, not including parks and reserves. There were 20 Callistemon species and nine Eucalyptus species.  The consultants identified 756 vacant sites where trees could be planted.

Mrs Caffin was asking the community what type of trees they would like around Dimboola based on four categories.

She said, “trees play an important part in communities, that have long terms benefits such as health and well being of the community, adaptation to climate change and the cooling of urban areas.”

With the use of a street map, consultants identified priorities for trees around Dimboola with Hindmarsh and Normandy street at the top of the list.

Mrs Caffin then asked the attendees to participate in three tasks to help identify what the community wanted for trees.

The first task was to vote with a dot to mark what they wanted for the community on four sample photos. The photos were of shady trees, coloured, main street and biodiversity.  The group had the option of creating their own group and they wrote on a seperate sheet. Each participant had four votes.

The two main selections were for colour and main street. Other selections included fruit trees, edible leaves, craft timbers and cultural heritage trees.

Mrs Caffin then had two maps of the town and post-It notes where people were asked to post a note on different area of the town and make a suggestion.

This information will be collated and used as a part of a future strategy, in a ten year plan for council.  

“While the contribution from the group came up with some excellent ideas and advice, unfortunately the small sample size may not reflect the true community needs,” she said.