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Communities stop to pay homage

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RESPECT AND REMEMBRANCE: The Warracknabeal and District leads the town’s march of ex-servicemen and wormen, along with community members, as part of the moving commemorative services held on Thursday morning.
RESPECT AND REMEMBRANCE: The Warracknabeal and District leads the town’s march of ex-servicemen and wormen, along with community members, as part of the moving commemorative services held on Thursday morning.

PEOPLE throughout Yarriambiack Shire turned out in force, once again, to pay their respects to those who gave their lives in World
War I and all subsequent conflicts on Thursday at dawn services, marches and other types of services.

In towns across the region, people gathered to mark the supreme sacrifice of so many in conflicts that took the country’s young men and women to far
flung places around the world in ceremonies that extends the day’s importance and meaning beyond the events of the landing in Gallipoli 104 years ago.

The numbers were almost as large as during the four year century commemorations, and many in the crowds are noticeably young people.

The last post echoed around the countryside at these simple but dignified commemorations honouring Australians’ service and sacrifice.

As the dawn came over the horizon, towns such as Sheep Hills, Hopetoun, and Murtoa, people came together at dawn in the crisp autumn air to pay
their respect to the memory of those who gave the greatest sacrifice.

Wreaths were laid during these services and then later in the day at events and marches in the other towns of the shire.

Sheep Hills

The Sheep Hills service included a march and wreath laying followed by a moving service in the Hall with guest speaker, Monsignor Glynn
Murphy, OAM, Principal Chaplain (Catholic) – Australian Army, providing a moving address about the ‘intangibles’ that define the Australian and New Zealand souls.

Minyip

At Minyip, the day began at the WWI memorial followed by a dignified service at the Memorial Hall.

Rupanyup

In Rupanyup the march commenced from the Police Station and a dignified service at the Memorial Hall in which many community members paid homage to all service men and women.

Murtoa

Murtoa continued its tribute to those who gave themselves to a higher cause with a breakfast at the RSL Club Rooms which was well attended by towns people.

Beulah

Beulah held a community service of remembrance at the Memorial Gates of the Recreation Reserve and followed this with a BBQ at the lake reserve.

Woomelang

Woomelang residents gathered together to pay their respects at the Memorial Hall with a morning tea for all to share in, at the completion of the formal event.

Patchewollock

Residents of Patchewollock in their tribute to servicemen and women during a moving ceremony after which everyone gathered for a light lunch at the Hall.

Brim

Brim residents and visitors came together for a dignified ed and moving service at the town’s Memorial Hall.

Warracknabeal

Warracknabeal gathered together in Scott Street for their march honouring the service of members of the Defence Force and followed this with a wreath laying ceremony at the now completely refurbished Memorial Gates at Anzac Park and the moving commemoration which followed in the Park. Piper, Cameron Whelan led the marches at both Sheep Hills and Warracknabeal, adding another element to the moving commemorations. in both sites.

The Warracknabeal and District Band provided musical support at Sheep Hills, Brim and Warracknabeal as they have now done for many years.

In one moment that spoke volumes of what ANZAC Day means to an individual, was the awarding of a certificate of Appreciation to bugler, Ken Smale, a man who has played the spine-tingling bugle calls for more than 70 years at Sheep Hills, Brim and Warracknabeal.

Gestures big and small, across the shire, showed the depth of feeling among the crowds; the proud display of service medals,several
generations of families marching alongside each other, the laying of fl oral tributes or simply getting out of bed early to take part in services were just some of the ways people across the shire showed their respect.

In all towns and gatherings, the message was simple but powerful; Lest we forget.